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Instructors Aikido Shudokan has world-class male and female senior instructors, each with a vast amount of experience behind them. Dojo (training hall) A training hall implies much more than simply a place to exercise.

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Grading System

To begin the study of Aikido is to begin a long and exciting journey with yourself and the art. As you progress, the journey may take a different path, which will reflect the changing of your goals over time.

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Uchidesih Dojosei Program

Aikido Shudokan offers Aikido practitioners who practice the Yoshinkan style of Aikido the chance to further their knowledge of Aikido by living in the dojo. As a dojosei or uchideshi, you are required to attend every class, including after-class training, in addition to completing duties to contribute to the upkeep of the dojo.

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Senior Instructors

Aikido Shudokan has passionate, world-class male and female instructors, each with a vast amount of experience behind them.

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Why Choose Us

The Aikido Shudokan is Australia's leading Aikido School. Techniques that work regardless of size The principles of Aikido allow a person of small size is able to maximise their own power whilst using their opponents power against them.

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Aikido for Kids

Aikido is an excellent martial art for children. It improves co-ordination, self-confidence and discipline while being active and great for fitness. At the Shudokan we have been teaching children this traditional Japanese martial art for over 30 years.

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Aikido Shudokan offers Aikido practitioners who practice the Yoshinkan style of Aikido the chance to further their knowledge of Aikido by living in the dojo. As a dojosei or uchideshi, you are required to attend every class, including after-class training, in addition to completing duties to contribute to the upkeep of the dojo. The life of a dojosei and uchideshi can be difficult physically and mentally but the efforts that a student puts in will be matched with equal reward. This is a traditional Japanese system where the student is given a great opportunity to learn the budo by immersing themselves in an environment which fosters this learning.

The dojo has several sleeping quarters where students can stay for a period of time. It also has all the facilities you need such as a kitchen, a laundry and showers, and you will be sharing the stay with the teacher, providing you with a greater opportunity for learning.

For any expression of interest, please contact us.

Past dojosei have written about their experiences:

To begin the study of Aikido is to begin a long and exciting journey with yourself and the art. As you progress, the journey may take a different path, which will reflect the changing of your goals over time.

Long term practice

Like any art, it requires dedication and persistence in order for you to gain maximum benefit from it. There will be times when it feels like you are not progressing or indeed, that it feels like you are going backwards, but to push through these periods and continue training will go towards your personal development. It is a journey that can last a lifetime, as you can constantly hone your skills and learn about yourself whilst in an environment which encourages and allows this to occur.

Aikido Shudokan emphasises the basics in order to develop a strong foundation, which takes time to build but allows a student to progress more easily when they reach an advanced level. In addition, your goals will evolve over time, and as this happens, your journey changes direction but the growth obtained through studying the art continues. As such, anyone can learn Aikido as each individual’s goals are different and Aikido allows for this.

Stages of Mastery

SHU – learning stage, Year 3-6 (blackbelt usually attained in this time)

HA – breaking the form, learning how it works, beginning to apply it naturally, Year 6-10

RI – moving away from the form, approaching true mastery, Year 20 +

Shudokan Belt System:

Students of Aikido are ranked by experience and skill. A beginner starts at 8th kyu (8th rank) and gradually makes their way to 1st kyu. The next level up is ‘shodan’ or the first level when the student is no longer a beginner. At this time the student is awarded their black belt.

Attributes to Develop as a Student

Junanshin (flexibility of mind) which is composed of patience, trust, humility, a supple mind and openness.

Mushin (no mind) refers to an inner emptiness, which is what is left after eliminating the unnecessary as created by the ego.

Focus, to stay present in the moment and disregard any distractions.

Mixing & Matching

Most competent martial artists agree, it is best to become grounded in one art before adding more. There are strengths and weaknesses in all martial arts but it is best to learn one very well and understand it before supplementing it with other arts.

Some arts are incompatible, choose carefully.

Gradings At the Shudokan

For each grading at the Shudokan, students must learn and memorise a series of techniques, including basic movements (Kihon Dosa) basic techniques (Kihon Waza). As you progress through the levels the level to which you are expected to perform the techniques lifts, and there is the addition of self-defense (Goshin Jitsu) free-style techniques (Jiyuwaza) sword Kata (Aiki-Ken) weapons work (Bokken-dori Jiyuwaza, Tanto-dori jiyuwaza) and multiple attacker jiyuwaza (Futari-dori, San nin-dori).

The Syllabi change yearly, and are downloadable in pdf form from this page.sam.

Instructors

Aikido Shudokan has world-class male and female senior instructors, each with a vast amount of experience behind them.

Dojo (training hall)

A training hall implies much more than simply a place to exercise. Literally meaning place to study the way’, upon entering the Dojo a higher standard of behaviour and awareness is required. When entering and leaving both the dojo or the mat area, one bow’s to show not just respect for the space, but signifying one’s transition between the outside world and the dojo.

Uniforms (Dogi & Hakama)

When training in Aikido, one wears a thick white uniform known as a Dogi (lit: uniform for studying the way). Additionally, teachers or senior students may also wear traditional pleated trousers known as Hakama . These two garments are training versions of traditional samurai wear, and are uniquely suited to training Aikido techniques.

Training equipment:

Aikido training also incorporates the use of Tatami (safety mats), Bokken (wooden sword), Tanto (wooden knife), Jo (wooden staff) and Tanjo (short wooden staff). Instruction in weapons are only taught to students of appropriate level.

Regular Adults Class Structure

  1. Before each class, a basic warm up takes place readying students for practice.
  2. Students sit upright in a row, facing the front. A senior student calls out ‘Rei’ and everyone bows with respect for the art, for their teachers and fellow students.
  3. Practice begins with Kihon Dosa. These are the basic movements of Aikido and are considered the building blocks of techniques.
  4. From here practice includes Kihon Waza (basic techniques) from the Aikido syllabus. The Kihon Waza are set techniques that teach students the underlying principles of Aikido. It can be said that the effective use of Aikido in battle relies upon intuitively applying principles to create techniques to fit the circumstances, rather than trying to fit circumstances to techniques.
  5. In class, students take turns practising techniques on each other. In addition to learning how to apply wrist locks and throws, students learn how to receive techniques safely by learning how to fall in different ways.


Childrens Class Structure

  1. Students arrive 15 – 30 minutes before the class starts and participates in games and activities until the class is about to begin.
  2. Students sit on their knees in one line and when the instructor sits at the front, an assistant gives the command ‘Shomen ni Rei’ and all students bow. This shows respect to the place of training and also the founders of the Art. The teacher faces the students and the command ‘Sensei ni Re’ is given and all students bow again. This shows respect to the teacher and to fellow students.
  3. Coordination and fitness activities will then take place. This often includes Ukemi (falling) practice, where students learn to fall to the ground in a safe manner.
  4. Aikido techniques are taught in the class, where the students learn to cooperate with each other to develop the best Aikido they can.
  5. Students engage in games and exercises which improve on skills that develop their Aikido such as focus, discipline, agility and awareness.